Answers Long Misunderstood

Mirror Mirror, Locked Gates, The Riddle Lord’s Secrets by Howard West Copyright 2011

cover 4

History, love stories and fairy-tales of wicked queens repeat themselves though most of us are bound to miss the point every time. Take for example the fall of Troy: a good mix of love stories, history and a wicked queen. For centuries Troy was thought to be a fictional kingdom, notwithstanding, Heinrich Schliemann, a self-educated German businessman read Homer and was convinced of the fundamental truth found in Homer’s story riddles of c. 800 years before the Christian era. Then in 1870, about twenty seven centuries after Homer’s death, Heinrich began to excavate near the village of Hissarlik in Asia Minor (Turkey)1 at which time Schliemann was under the same curse of disbelief that Cassandra had been under. Even so, Heinrich was vindicated, when he found architectural remains at his site at the village of Hissarlik, this evidence was in superposed layers and a wealth of artifacts were uncovered, objects made of stone, copper, silver, and gold. This discovery quickly forced the Gatekeepers of knowledge to revise their conclusion about the Heroic Age. Schliemann named the site The City Priam2 named for Homer’s, King of Troy. After Schliemann’s death, Wilhelm Dorpfeld continued Schliemann’s work and between 1893 and 1894 found “The Sixth Settlement.” This was contemporary with the “Mycenae” epoch of early Greece and was in turn called “Troy.”

The Greek Playwright, Aeschylus also wrote an account of the fall of Troy and of two adulterous women3. First a good-looking woman named Helen, the wife of Menelmaus, King of Sparta. Helen4 had gotten the Ancient world into a twist more than three thousand years ago, when she ran off with Cassandra’s brother to Troy. This caused Agamemnon, the King’s brother and the Greek army, to go to Troy to bring Helen back to Mycenae. Even as the siege ensued, a second woman was waiting in her palace, at Mycenae for word of the battle. This wicked queen’s name was Clytemnestra5, sister in-law to Helen and the woman who would later kill our poor little Cassandra. Clytemnestra was the unfaithful wife of Agamemnon the Commander of the Greek Forces. Agamemnon had aggravated the problems with both Troy and his wife by stealing Chryemneis, the daughter of one of the priests of Troy. Back in Mycenae, Clytemnestra was more than four hundred and fifty miles from Troy by land and two hundred and fifty miles by a land-sea route. As Clytemnestra paced back and forth, she wondered how long must she wait for news of the war, trying to make sure that her husband, Agamemnon did not come home unexpectedly from the War and find her in bed with her new lover.

If Caesar Augustus’ (born 27 years before the Christian era and died in the year 14 CE) Postal System6 had been available to Clytemnestra, those postal riders would have taken four and a half days to make the trip from Troy, with an average speed of one hundred miles per day. If William F. “Buffalo Bill “ Cody’ and his co-riders of the Pony Express7 were doing the delivery, the trip would have taken three days, based on the best time from St. Joseph to Sacramento8. The carrier pigeon message system9 developed by the Arabs sometime between the seventh and the ninth century of the Christian era, would have taken two days if the little pigeon came back at all. The square sailed ships of the time just would not meet the new racing yacht specifications of today, and if the winds were contrary the Greek square sailed ships could have taken days and days and if Odyssey was in charge years,

The funny thing is that Aeschylus, the Greek dramatist10: said that Clytemnestra knew of the fall of Troy that day. But how could she know? Did space aliens tell her? NO! Was Clytemnestra a clairvoyant?11 NO! Did she have an out of body experience then? NO! Catoptromance12 (Magic Mirrors) Now you’re getting close. But where is the thread that will start to unravel this Knot? Xenophon (434-355 years before the Christian era13) the ancient Greek war hero and historian answers that question in his history of ancient Greece called Hellenica. Nevertheless, Xenophon’s words like Cassandras’ words have been rejected by the Gatekeepers of knowledge. Even so, Hellenica contains the phrase to:

Signal with a Shield”

8 jpg signal with shield 2

This refers to reflecting sunlight with a mirrored shield. Those mirrors were called aspis14 the Ancient Greek word for snakes or mirrored shields. The messages that were sent by these ancient heliographs were called “aspasmos15 to “handle the shield.” Yes, they were what you would call Magic Mirrors the same kind that gave Clytemnestra the extra time needed to make sure she did not get caught with her new lover and what allowed Snow White’s wicked step mother to find The Fairest of them all.

Now why are those aspis or heliographs so important: because those Magic Mirrors gave the ancient world of the Eastern Mediterranean a system of communication equal to that of the late 19th to early 20th centuries. Think about that concept because the Gatekeepers of knowledge are blissfully unaware of that fact that thousands of years ago the cultures of the Middle East had almost instant communication between cities hundreds of miles apart. This is something that modern “Man” has only had for about one hundred and fifty years.

Aeschylus speaks of a system of dozens of beacons lights on mountaintops and watchtowers from Troy to Mycenae and Clytemnestra’s mansion. This indicates a network of beacons running at light speed more than three thousand years ago: though the Greek system was not the first of its kind. Such a system of this kind would not be instantly useable. The construction of such, a system would take time, to build watchtowers and climb mountains to find line of sight locations and a code system would also have to be developed. If this story has a hint of truth, there would have to be some remnants of that type of network, and of the code system that was used. Sorry to say, most of the skeptics will say:

fine, they were some campfires on the hills” or “It was a short-lived or one time fluke of history” or “I never heard of any such system used consistently at that time.”

 

9 jpg moon mirror

Not only is there evidence of this type of heliographic system throughout history, NASA uses that same basic system today. A two-way communication system working between the Earth and the Moon, the system has a light source on Earth and a mirrored device on the Moon, a beam of light with a series of blinks that have a time sequence is sent to the Moon and light is reflected back to Earth.16

Ringed by footprints, sitting in the moon dust, lies a 2-foot wide panel studded with 100 (magic) Mirrors pointing at Earth. It is the “lunar laser ranging retro reflector array” that Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong put there on July 21, 1969, about an hour before the end of their final moonwalk…” and it’s the only Apollo science experiment still running”17

The university of Maryland physics professor Carroll Alley was the project’s principal investigator during the Apollo years, and he follows its progress today.

Using these mirrors,” explains Alley, “we can ‘ping’ the moon with laser pulses and measure the Earth-moon distance very precisely. This is a wonderful way to learn about the moon’s orbit and to test theories of gravity.”18

Flashes of light from the Past are the current “craze” in computing and fiber optic communication. Light flowing through tiny silken threads of glass -short little blinks of light– traveling over hundreds of miles of cable from computer to computer. The State of the Art is light transmission of data, real High Tech 21th century science: Guess what? Most of you send hundreds of “LIGHT” speed messages every year: to thousands of people you do not even know, with just a little stick and a tap of your foot. You do this when you drive a car. A series of blinks tells folks that you are turning, or a longer dash says you are slowing down or stopping. Not so high tech now, you use blinks of light every day without thinking. You automatically know what those blinks mean and adjust your speed or location without even thinking. Paul Revere used blinks of lights in a church steeple in the American Revolutionary War. For a secure short range means of communication, The United States Navy still uses a Blinker or Flasher Light System to send messages from “ship to ship” or “ship to shore.” The system consists of a hooded light and a Venetian blind shutter19: and you thought that the Venetian’s invented that type of light baffle to keep the light out of your eyes: No. Those louvers were developed to keep the light (message) from the eyes of their enemy.

Not everyone has rejected Xenophon’s evidence of the viability of the Aspis or Bright Shields communications. William Von Graysand and Johann Gass developed a Bright Shield system in Europe20. Sadly Von Graysand and Gass did not possess an adequate code system. However, the Celts in Ireland and Wales were using a flasher code called Ogham with great success a few centuries before Von Graysand and Gass system was developed, but Von Graysand and Gass were not as successful as those who were able to overcome the problems in the desert lands, Even so, the Russians of the 19th century used a flasher system. Nicholas I (1796-1855 of the Christian era) a Tsar of Russia (1825-1855)21 governed Russia with an iron hand and a centralized administration, a good communication system was needed. Old Nick set up a beacon light system with a network of more than two hundred and twenty repeater stations that stretched from the frontier of Austria to St. Petersburg. The government was the primary user of this system; even so, that communication system22 became a boon to the Merchants between both points.

10 jpg US army heliograph black

In the American southwest during the 1870s and 1880s of the Christian era the Apache Indians gave23 the United States government a run for its money, when the Apache cut telegraph wires and disrupted that communication system. The Apache also had a superior communication system of their own using Capornancy (smoke signals). Nevertheless, the US army was given a new Catoptromance invention of less than thirty years, a toy really: a lady’s pocket mirror. Justus Von Liebig had just developed the process of silver on glass in the year 1853. Before that, most mirrors were made of metal although the most effective and easiest to build was a copper plate that was coated with an oily liquid metal: quicksilver. The mercury would act just like oil in a fry pan and leave a thin even finish with the excess easily wiped off, the same process that the Alchemist used in their trick of turning a copper coin silver with a little mercury. Those magic mercury mirrors are still being used today by astronomers. Some of the world’s most powerful telescopes have liquid metal surfaces, magic mirrors that allow those astronomers to travel through time millions of years into the past without leaving their offices.24

To give a perspective to how these Magic Mirrors, heliographs, or aspis worked in the distant past, we need only to go to America’s recent past of its Wild, Wild West, when telegraph lines were easily cut. General Nelson A. Miles25 turned the tables on the Apaches with steam trains, pack mules, Cyrsteloge, (telescopes) and Catoptromance (the heliograph system developed by Gauss 26). The telescopes gave the Army the ability to know the future or at least to see that future coming. The pack mules gave the troops an endless supply of food and ammunition. The heliograph was a giant step beyond the simple mirror Catoptromance system however, with this system the troops on the move, a single mirror system could not always be seen if the Sun was at the wrong angle.

twin heliograph

Sir Henry Mance’s heliographic system added a second mirror; each of the two mirrors could be tilted or rotated. This movement allowed the lower mirror to be turned and tilted to catch the sun at the best angle and reflect that light to the top mirror. The upper mirror could then be turned to allow it to send the light to the location of the troops. The heliograph’s mirror had a telegraph type key to tip the mirror or in some cases shutters or lovers were used to allow the Magic Mirror to blink the message.

General Nelson A. Miles described the historic surrender of Geronimo and the Magic Mirror connection is as follow:

I (General Miles) told him (Geronimo) that we had the use of steam and could move with great rapidity. That we also had the telegraph and the heliostat (heliograph), both superior to any of their methods of communication

I (General Miles) said to (Geronimo) ‘We can watch your movements and send messages over the tops of the mountains in the small part of a day that would take a mounted man on a swift pony twenty days to travel” (Geronimo) told me he had observed these flashes of light upon the mountain heights and believed them to be spirits.”

For a demonstration a heilographic message was sent to inquirer of Geronimo’s brother at Fort Bowie. This is the response of Geronimo on the receipt of the return message as told by Miles.

This struck the savage with awe, and evidently made a strong impression upon him. I (General Miles) noticed that he (Geronimo) said something to one of his warriors close by him, at which the warrior quietly turned on his heel, and walked a short distance where his pony was lariated, jumped on his back and rode rapidly back in the direction of the mountains from which Geronimo had come.”

Miles asked what Geronimo had said.

The interpreter replied: “He (Geronimo) told him to go tell Natchez that there was a power here which he (Geronimo) could not understand: and to come in, and come quick.”

The heliograph had performed its magical God like function as it had in the centuries past and in a few hours Natchez came down from the mountain.

The western states of Arizona, New Mexico, and Nevada, used a heliographic network of sentinels out posts in the high desert for a time in the late 19th century and the British also used a heliographic system in southern Africa and in the Sub Continent in the same era. The heliograph also provided the mobile communication element in the British service which was devised by Sir Henry Mance at Bombay in 1869. The system would be transported to high ground location on horseback. The location usually was on a high open mountaintop that was clear on all sides. This heliographic system was the forerunner of our modern satellite surveillance systems. This communication system was a huge leap forward in technology, or was it backwards?

 cover_thumb.jpg

Locked Gates (The Riddle Lord’s Secrets)

The non-fiction book Locked Gates, The Riddle Lords Secrets by Howard West is published in Hard Cover format and is currently available through brick and mortar book stores and online retailers including Amazon.com

1 Wood, M., In Search of the Trojan War New York :Plume/ New American Library P. 2,48, Duckworth, G.E, “Trojan war”, Colliers Encyclopedia, Great Britain : The Crowell- Colliers Publishing CO: 1965, Vol. 7 p 307-309, Vol.22, Vol. 20. P485,86

2Ibid

3Caskely, J.L, ”Troy”, Op. Cite, Colliers Vol. 22 P494-495

4 Helen was symbolic of the beauty of Greek (Hellenistic) thought and logic that was being “Hi Jacked “ by the Trojans

5Clytemnestra was symbolic of the Greek public that was sliding away from Greek (Hellenistic) thought and logic into self-centered lust, pleasing themselves rather than adhering to the Greek’s system of thought and logic.

6 Gregg, I. “Postal System”, Op. Cite, Colliers Vol.19 P289

7Ibid

8Ibid

937Ibid

10, Aeschylus, Op. Cite, Colliers , Vol., 1

11Hall-Quest A. L. Fortune Telling, Op. Cite, Colliers , Vol., 10, p. 221

12 Ibid

13Xenophon, Hellenica Translated By Warner R, March Up Country, Miller R. L., Communications, Op. Cite, Colliers Vol.7,P74

14 Strongs, Op. Cite, Greek, no, 785

153Ibid, no., 783

16Phillips, DR. T., Mirrors on the Moon”, Science@ NASA.com

17 Ibid

18Ibid

19 Kelly, R. E. Talking Mirrors Versus The Indian, Frontier Times ,Western Publications inc Austin Texas

20Miller R. L., Communications, Op. Cite, Colliers Vol.7,P74

21Ibid, P74

22 Ibid

23Kelly, R. E. Op. Cite,

25Kelly, R. E. Op. Cite,

26Harris J. D. Amery (ED) Times History, Vol 5, p559

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s